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Showing posts from 2023
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This past week, there was a bunch of online/tech chatter about a new (just emerged from stealth mode) hardware + services startup called Mill.   It is from the founder of Nest, who's thermostat changed that entire product category, so the history of success instantly gives this new thing - a composting bin + a service to take your food waste - some credibility.  Mill is a super-fancy kitchen composter that basically cooks your food waste to ensure the bin doesn't start stinking.   #13 on this past year's list was to do more with composting - including under the sink kitchen food waste .  I have the bin, I just stopped filling it in not for any particular reason. The Mill news was enough to nudge me back into the kitchen scrape food waste game.  It didn't take long to fill the little bin with vegetable scraps, egg shells, coffee grinds and house plant foliage.   I used a compostable bag to line the bin, but it was *so* compostable that it had already started to break do

More Evidence: Bob Dylan Songs Are Best Sung By Female Singers

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Thirteen years ago, I wrote a blog post here on the blog where i posited that Bob Dylan was, perhaps, the best songwriter for female singer s.  What I meant was that female singers who covered Bob Dylan songs were eye-openers for me.  I included (maybe?) the most-famous cover of "Make You Feel My Love" by Adele .  But, what really has stuck with me is Sheryl Crow's version of Mississippi.   Note here:  I recognize that we're (now) in 2023 and the notion of female vs male singers (that I used initially back in 2010) might not be a valid or appropriate framework for everyone today.  That's fine.   I'm going to use that construct here - with positive intent - because I think it makes sense for this discussion.   Back then, posting musings on various topics on personal blogs were a thing 1 and that's where hot takes like this lived.  But, the conversation around my (apparently provocative) post was taking place on the Bob Dylan news/forum site:  Expecting Rai

Variety vs Cultivar vs Sport - Gardening Parlance - February 2023

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I'm nothing if not a gardener who keeps learning with every shovelful of dirt and every keystroke digging around the Web. And, I'm also guilty of calling things the wrong name from time-to-time. Part of what I've tried to do is to learn the actual plant names (genus species) vs. the trade names. But, I've also thrown around the terms 'variety' and 'cultivar' and 'sport' all over the place and NOT really learned when/where to use each one. What prompted me to think about the terms was an email from Gardeners Supply where they showed some 'common gardening terms' including Variety and Cultivar.  Here's a landing page  they have of those and other gardening terms like hybrid, heirloom and open-pollinated. A couple of nuggets from  that page : Many commonly available plants are varieties or cultivars, with interesting features that make them more desirable than the straight species.  Some cultivars are patented, making it illegal to propa

An Early Look at Some (Potential) Priority Projects - January 2023

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This post is laden with caveats.  Potential, Early, Initial.  I'm thinking of this as a sort of mental workshop via blog post writing and publishing.  What better way to force ones self to begin to identify, list and rank priorities than to run through some of the potential options.   Priorities?  Yeah...I've done this a few years now - in an attempt to reign myself in when it comes to buying and placing plants.  Starting back in Winter of 2020, I started to write about some 'priority areas' that I knew I wanted to address and those 'areas' ended up being one of the KEY INPUTS (and often the first few items) on my annual Yard and Garden To-Do list.   Having recently published my 2022 'scorecard' , I want to think about where we go in 2023.  Again...I'm going to re-caveat this whole thing:  this is a workshop post.  Just spit-ballin' things here.  It will be messy, but I think it will be helpful.  What this isn't is a full exploration into e

2023 PW Plants Of The Year - January 2023

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Proven Winners has come out with their 2023 plants of the year recently and the list includes a few things of note (for me) that are worth getting to know a bit. Before I run through the ones that standout to me, I thought it was important to remind (myself) what Proven Winners uses as their criteria.  Now...Proven Winners is in the business of selling A LOT of plants, so what they say are their 'winners' are grounded in that:  commerce.  But... here's what they say are their criteria :   Easy to grow Iconic Readily available Outstanding landscape performance Easy to grow...for who?  Them...in their greenhouses?  Or, me the intermediate gardener with a shade-filled yard that lacks irrigation in Zone 5b?   Readily available speaks to their ease of growing, so they're really saying 'easy to grow' twice. That last one:  outstanding performance.  This one is the key.  Again...performance of what?   There are other groups who name X of the year - like the Perennial

Why Didn't My Paperwhites Bloom? January 2023

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We're one month past Christmas.  I think that's enough time to pass for me to officially declare that my PaperWhites are a failure.  No blooms at all.  I bought them in early November - a week-plus ahead of when we traditionally buy and start our Amaryllis bulbs.  But...here's the key (I think):  I bought them from the orange big box store .  I planted them as directed:  in gravel.  And watered them in up to the middle of the bulbs.  They responded immediately.  And strongly.  With a thick, dense and vibrant root mat that came off of each of them.  They also shot up new green shoots from the top of the bulbs.   Based on what I've done before (with Amaryllis bulbs) and what was suggested on the Web, I watered them in with a diluted alcohol mixture .  In an attempt to stunt their growth and keep them from 'flopping over' and getting too leggy.   I last checked-in on these in mid-December.  More than a month after the roots emerged.  And they all had multiple green

2022 Google Maps Location Timeline - January 2023

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Earlier this year, the fine people at Google shared an automatically-created "Timeline" of my travels based on Google Maps and the location tracking via my Android device.  There's lots of worth-while discussion about technology and privacy, but I think this is a pretty good use case for using the technology and information that you personally create by navigating the world into something interesting - and very personal.  I've posted about this recap in the past - here's the version that I shared in early 2021 that covered my COVID year including the 'stay at home' days .  There's a SHARP contrast between Jan and Feb and the rest of the year that the data shows. What about 2022?  We did a little travel and I was back in the office more than in 2021.   Here's a few looks at the data below.  First...modes of travel.  Walking vs. Driving vs. Transit.  Very little walking in January and February.  That's interesting. Similarly...though...driving wa

Solving a Rubik's Cube - January 2023

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I'm not exactly sure WHY I started to try to learn how to solve - after all these years - a Rubik's Cube, but over the past three-plus weeks, I've been working on scrambling and solving whenever I'm sitting on the couch and have a little time to waste.  Thanks to YouTube - and the fact that you can slow videos down playback speed-wise - I have gotten pretty good at solving a lot of the cube by memory.  I still don't have the last few steps memorized, but I'm continuing to work on it. The video that I used was this one that features WIRED's Robbie Gonzalez showing the steps he learned.   What solves and algorithms do I have down? Bottom white face.  Done. Bottom two rows.  Done. Yellow top face.  Done. What algorithms don't I have committed to memory (just yet)? Setting the corners.  Sometimes this just happens naturally, so I skip it.   And doing the final solve.

Snow-Covered Tree Limbs In Our Snowy Backyard - January 2023

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This week, we woke up to a white-out in our backyard with fresh snow on the ground and clinging to every branch and limb in the yard.  Made for a pretty view.  Until I had to go out and shovel.  Multiple times.   While it feels awfully far away from gardening season, it sure seems like I have to start sorting my priorities in the next few weeks as late Winter/early Spring tasks will soon be upon us. 

Why Winter Rose Poinsettias Are All I'll Buy Now - January 2023

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In early December, I p icked up a 6" Winter Rose Poinsettia for $9 at the orange big box store and brought it home for the season .  We have - typically - bought a Christmas poinsettia, but when we came across the Winter Rose, I did a quick Web search to learn a little bit about this specific variety. By now - late January - our typical Christmas Poinsettia is usually looking pretty ratty.  Leaf-drop, leggy stems, etc.    The Winter Rose promised a longer shelf life and that's turned out to be true for us - in a big way.  See below for the Winter Rose Poinsettia that is sitting on our kitchen table today: I'd call this plant being in 'full bloom' - but I know it isn't blooming.  Those are leaves, not flower petals. But...still....look at it.  It is thriving.   What's not to love about this pop of color well-past Christmas?  January and February are hard, hard months for growing, so seeing this thing do so well has really affirmed - for me - that the choice

Firewood Consumption Check-in - Late January 2023

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The last time that I ran a [ firewood consumption ] check-in for this season was seven weeks ago on December 1st .  At that time - which was 60 days into the burning season - we had emptied the smaller sideyard rack (and replaced it with Norway Maple) and had burned about 1/3rd of the larger one.  The two inside racks were - at that time - mostly full. I consider the burning season to be 5 months long - about 150 days.  October, Nov Dec = 90 days.  Jan, Feb = 60 days.  Total of 150 ending on March 1st.   Where are we today?  115 days out of 150 = 76% thru the season. The most-recent comparison is from this past February when I had quite a bit of wood left.  See this post .  At that point, the two inside racks were full (just like now), the stoop rack was full and there was a pile inside the garage.   Let's look at the racks as they stand today.  First...the two inside racks are, indeed full.  No photos of those.  But, the stoop rack - looks like last February and is 'mostly'

Growing A Shield Frond On Staghorn Fern - January 2023

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My Staghorn Fern journey started back in March of 2021 with the purchase of a small, potted Staghorn Fern from the orange Big Box store.  As I learned a little bit (or...'got to know') Staghorns, I decided to just leave this one in the plastic container that it came in, but modified to provide for A TON of drainage/airflow with holes all over it. That first Summer, I put it outside and it seemed to thrive .  I brought it inside as the weather turned and put that Fern - along with other houseplants - under a grow light during the Winter.  Two years ago tomorrow (Jan 24, 2022), I posted some photos showing the first real 'Antler-shaped fronds' that the fern had grown .  This was a real milestone as the fern started to *look* like a real Staghorn Fern.  That small series of successes lead me to take on even more with Staghorns. I bought more, mounted some of them.  And...didn't really get the results I wanted.  But, I also gave away a pair of the mounted Ferns to folk

Made for Trader Vic's Pottery - Tiki Rum Bowl - January 2023

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Nat and I don't exchange a ton of Christmas gifts during the gifting season.  But, we *do* exchange some gifts.  I typically will give her a vintage book, a Wash U shirt and starting last year...a Tiki Bar item.  When we finished our basement, we talked about putting in a Tiki Bar down there.  We did all the rough-in's for a bar - light openings in the ceiling, water and plumbing in the wall, counter-height outlets for a bar and under-counter fridges.  But, we didn't put in said Tiki Bar.  Just left the space open for the kids to use as part of the rumpus room.   But, that doesn't mean that she isn't still dreaming of that - in the future - Tiki Bar.  I even went ahead and gave this dreamed-up Tiki Bar a name:  Natalie's Hideaway.  Last year, I commissioned Tiki Tony the artist to create a sign for the place, too.   So, when I came across 1 a big tiki bar-themed bowl with ladies in bikinis, palm trees, hula dancers and a big rum barrel on it, I thought it would

Leather Drivers-Style Buck Skin Gardening Gloves - January 2023

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It took close to ten years, but I finally am the owner of a pair of gloves that I've been wanting to use in the garden.  All the way back in September of 2013, Neil Steinberg posted a love-letter to a pair of Chicago-manufactured gloves and I have wanted them ever-since.  At that time, the gloves were made by a a company called J. Edwards who sold the gloves only to distributors.  But, at some point, they were either acquired or merged with the Kunz Glove Company who (as of 2022) ran an ecommerce storefront or sold them to folks who sell one pair at a time like here .  You're probably thinking:  dude...just go buy some gloves from the orange Big Box store.  I'm sure they'd be fine, but if you go back and read the post from Neil Steinberg , you might come to the same conclusion that I have:  these are special.   So, these gloves are now mine- my Christmas gift from Nat.  And, I can't wait to use them in the garden.  See below for the Buck Skin garden gloves that are

Getting Re-Introduced To Birch Trees - January 2023

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One of the great joys of keeping a garden journal or garden diary is that it allows you to see how much you've changed over the years.  The changes happen with growth and die-back of the plants, but also in your tastes and preferences of plant materials.  That's certainly happened to me as I've gotten to know trees and plants and both what works and what doesn't.  But also, what is the *right* plant (natives, drought-tolerant) and what might be the *wrong* plant (invasive or short-lived).   Take for instance the flowering pear tree.  When I started, I was so excited and proud to plant a small, $5 Cleveland Pear tree in our old yard.  It thrived .  So much so, that I bought even more of them.  Little did I know (at the time) that they're both NOT great trees in terms of longevity, but also...if you get the wrong variety...they're invasive.   I even went so far as to plant a couple at our new house when we moved.  Would I plant those today?  I don't think so. 

Spice Bush Rabbit Damage - Winter 2023 - January 2023

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One of the plants that I picked up at this past year's Morton Arboretum Plant Sale - BUT failed to post about when I planted - was this decidious shrub called a Spice Bush (Lindera benzoin).  I tucked it in back by the fire pit and mostly forgot about it.  Below is a snapshot of the sign from the sale that I took back in April and you can see that it has a Forsythia with yellow Spring flowers.   Below is the plant tag showing that it will grow up to be 6-12 feet tall and 6-12 feet wide.  And will handle partial shade: Below is a photo showing what it looked like when we brought it home with green leaves on woody stems.  It was about 15" tall from the soil-level. This was, clearly, not on the plan.  But, we still bought it, on a whim. The REAL reason that we bought it was that the lady at the sale told us about the Spice Bush Swallowtail, a butterfly, that relies on this plant during the caterpillar stage .  What's not to like about that, right?   Helps us continue to meet

2022 - Year In Blogging - 365 Posts Everyday

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The end of the year came-and-went and I failed to mark the closing of another chapter in daily blog posting here in my online diary.  If you look at the full archives over on the left rail, you'll see that I published 365 posts in 2022 - one for each and every day.   I've written similar recap posts over the year, including last year .  2022 marks the eighth straight year that I hit 365 posts.  One everyday since 2015.   With the first part of 2023 already behind me, it is wild to think that I'm now in my 19th calendar year of posting to this blog.   I did a quick look and it appears that I wrote 307 of the 365 posts (84%) using the [ garden diary ] tag - up from 260 out of 365 (70%) posts in 2021.      Posting here on my own little blog has been something that I have enjoyed doing - creating, writing and publishing - in a venue of my own.  With all the uncertainty around the Web and in particular (some people's feelings about) Twitter, there feels like there is a sligh

Winter Marcescence on London Plane Tree - January 2023

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Posting a photo here in the tree diary to show that the young London Plane Tree that I planted in Spring 2020 is exhibiting some Winter foliar marcescence with a series of brown, dry leaves clinging to the branches.   This tree - the Grampy tree ( because I used some $$$ from him for my birthday to buy ) was planted in the beginning of the pandemic in 2020 .  After a brief period of transplant-stress, the tree seemed to get on just fine.  This past season, I was able to water this due to it being inside the footprint of some of the 2022-planted Green Giant Thujas - so it seemed to be in a fine spot with growth.  However...this is the first year that I've really noticed - or documented - the tree holding on to some dead leaves.  See below for a photo of the tree in early January 2023: Seeing this tree cling to some of the leaves is a good note for the tree diary - and something that is going to cause me to look over the rest of these trees - including the one I recently planted in

Black Walnuts Stored And Shared In Winter - January 2023

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Starting in the Fall of 2021, I started to collect almost a full five-gallon bucket full of Black Walnuts that were falling from our Black Walnut trees in the backyard.  The goal - with that collection - was to try to make some home-brewed Black Walnut stain.  I ended up making a batch and gave it away for Christmas in 2021 .  I wanted to try the process again this past Fall, so I was out there - in the backyard - picking up the Black Walnuts all Fall.  And started to fill the same five-gallon bucket.   That was a once-or-so-per week activity of pickup up a couple handful of green balls and dropping them in a bucket.  I topped the bucket with another bucket with holes - so it would breath.  And left it out in the landscape.   Then, winter came.  And I never did anything with the walnuts.  No stain-making.   I was out back splitting some Norway Maple firewood and noticed the bucket.  I lifted the lid to see that it is loaded with walnuts.  Rotting walnuts.  Or, at least...rotting husks.

New Push-Pull Garden Hoe - DeWit - January 2023

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Earlier this year, in the 'scorecard' post of my 2022 garden to-do list, I marked the 'upgrade my garden tools' item as 'complete' and mentioned that I was set to explain that with a new tool that I received as a Christmas gift.  This post...is paying off that item - and showing a new Dutch push-pull diamond-shaped garden hoe with p-grip.  This one is from DeWit Garden tools and features a 84" wooden handle - with that p-grip that you can see in the first photo: Below is a look at the diamond-cutting head of this long, push/pull hoe: Below is the product label that lists this as: DeWit Dutch Diamond Push/Pull Hoe with Ash Handle - 1700mm.   And, finally, below you can see the DeWit logo on the metal head that connects to the ash wooden long handle: This is the second wood-handled garden tool that I have - with the first one being a Sneeboer garden hoe .  In that post, I mentioned that I've been thinking about this very push/pull hoe based on the recomm

Winter Nimblewill In Lawn Progress Report - January 2023

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This past season, I finally figured out that our backyard was infested with a warm-season grass/weed called Nimblewill and came up with a plan to treat it in place while not doing a full cool-season grass renovation.  That started with using a post-emergent spray called Tenacity  - which caused the Nimblewill to white-out and die .   Once that ran its course, I then began a project using a pre-germination seed technique followed by a project to overseed the lawn with a mix of Kentucky Blue Grass and Tall Fescue .  Which...after some watering... resulted in a bunch of new germination . And, while I was happy with the result in the Fall with new, green grass filling in plenty of bare spots, I knew the real, important results, would be visible once the lawn went totally dormant.  That's because, the Nimblewill is a warm-season grass and totally dies back once the temperature drops.  Which, historically have left us with a bunch of bare spots in the lawn and other areas with white,