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Showing posts with the label oven planning

2x8 Forms for Hearth Concrete Pour - Wood-Fired Oven Build - June 2024

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Busy week with the pizza oven.  First, the bottom trays and supports were put in-place .   Then, I cut, bent and placed some rebar into the top of the stand - via the bond beam blocks .  I also cut most of the grid of rebar.   That meant that I could move-on to creating the hearth forms.  I used 1/2" trays and I'd like the hearth to be 4" or so thick, so that means I need 4.5" of height on-top of the stand.  Because of the Bond Beam blocks and their openings, I also need the forms to cover 1.5" of the stand.  That's 6" of form - which means I can't use a 2x6, but had to upgrade to 2x8's. I cut the 2x8's to length, then affixed a 2x4 to the face of them to stiffen them - and prevent bowing.  I used various pieces of lumber to create legs that were just a tiny bit short.  I put the forms together, stood-it-up on the legs and then shimmed in one side for the final height.   Moving around the stand, I leveled up each side using shims to get the

Cutting and Bending Rebar for Flow-Thru Bond Beam Blocks in Pizza Oven Stand - June 2024

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Earlier this week, I updated my wood-fired pizza oven build progress with some photos showing the bottom trays and their supports/bracing cut to size .  I have a couple of things that I need to do (I lifted eight steps - bracing for trays shimmed, rebar to bond beam blocks, fill gaps, cut rebar for grid, set up 2x8 forms, wire them, add drainage pipes and fill remaining cores with sand ) and most of those can go in any order.    Once I had the trays in place, I decided to see if I had enough rebar on hand to complete the job.  That started with bending some of the 1/2" steel rebar for around the bond beam blocks.  Then, I cut the rest for across the top in a grid pattern. Below is a photo showing the rebar bent and laid into the bond-beam blocks.  I'm doing curved rebar at every corner and doubling-it-up with 90-degree corners on top of those curves.   On top of this will be a 4.5" thick hearth, so the rebar you see running across the top of the stand will be stood-up wit

Adding Bottom Tray Support Under Hearth Pour - DIY Wood-Fired Oven Build - June 2024

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The next step after filling every-other-core in my DIY wood-fired oven build is to create the support that goes *under* the hearth that can support the concrete pour.  I've made three areas for storage in the stand, so each of those need a cover (or lid) and some support bracing to keep the concrete from sagging through the openings.  I opted to use 1/2" DensShield board and various 2x4's and 2x6's to create the supports under the openings.  Below are a few photos showing how I cut the board (1/2" thick) and then used the legs to support/span the openings. Below is a peek at the INSIDE of one of the storage bins and you can see the legs/supports laying this-way-and-that.  Why?  Because...I cut them just a little bit short of the length needed.  My plan is to use a bunch of wood shims under these so once the pour is complete, I can pull the shims out and the supports will fall away.   Without the shims, the supports might not come out so easily.   Also, I'm us

Brick Exterior Exploration - Pizza Oven Build - June 2024

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My brain is already moving ahead to the exterior of the pizza oven.  I don't know if I'll get to cladding the outside of the oven, but I'd like to try this year.  You can go a lot of directions, but the one that I've focused on/been drawn-to is brick.  I've talked about brick and used a TikTok as potential inspiration for a brick pattern . That means that I've been poking around Facebook marketplace and Craigslist to figure out what kind of brick is available.  Every listing quotes the number of bricks available, but I had no idea how many bricks I actually need to clad the full oven.   In terms of oven facade inspiration, I'm very much looking to this oven build on YouTube as inspiration .  That oven is from the YouTube channel named:  The log cabin life style by Jerry Tyson .  This screenshot below is from his oven-build video ( source ) and I'm eye-balling the height of his corners to be five-feet-tall.   I know my stand is 70 inches deep by 62.5 in

Drystacking Pizza Oven Stand And Filling Cores - June 2024

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Last week, my pizza oven build update included how I had purchased a 10" wetsaw and mortared in the first course of the cinder block stand .  On top of that first course of block sits the rest of the stand, but I opted to simply dry-stack them in place.  The height of the oven floor is one of the biggest build considerations and I'm aiming for between 44 and 46 inches in height.  Based on some tests, that's where I'm comfortable and want to aim to hit when I build the stand, add the insulation and place the floor.   The floor is made of medium-duty firebricks that are 2.5" thick.  Set on a thin base of high heat mortar and/or sand.  Call it 1/4".  4" of insulation below that puts me at 6.75" of height.  The hearth has a little bit of flexibility in it - thickness-wise.  But, call it about 4 to 5 inches thick.  That means, I needed to do a little math to figure out how many courses I needed to build.   46 inches minus 6.75 inches = 39.25".  Sub

DIY Pizza Oven Build - 10" Wet Saw - Tools Needed - May 2024

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So far in my diy backyard wood-fired pizza oven build, all that I've talked about/posted about is what I'll call infrastructure.  That's the foundation slab (reinforced), the block stand (cores filled) and the suspended hearth (reinforced).  But, once all that is out of the way, it quickly becomes a brick-cutting exercise.  Medium-duty firebricks are 2.5" thick, 4.5" wide and 9" long.  They're beefy.   Each of those bricks require 4 (or so) cuts to make them useable in the dome.  In order to cut those big firebricks, one needs a saw that is both ready to cut brick (wet saw) and has a big throat (cut depth), so you don't have to cut one-side, then flip, and cut the other. After bouncing around Facebook Marketplace and Craigslist for months, I decided to take the plunge with a new saw from Harbor Freight.  Between their Memorial Day sale, another discount (membership) and a gift card that I was given for my birthday earlier this year, the new 10" D

Couple of Wood-Fired Pizza Oven Hearth Construction Tips Via YouTube - May 2024

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Last week, I posted my latest update on our backyard pizza oven build where I mortared in the first course of the cinderblock stand .  I'm on my way this week to swap out some of the blocks and to pick up the rest of the angle iron so I can drystack the rest of the stand.  At risk of getting things out of order, I'm going to talk a little bit about the suspended hearth.  That hearth sits ON TOP of the stand.  It is reinforced concrete that is framed up with a 2x6.  That means - at the VERY MOST, the hearth is 5.5" thick.  But, because you overlap the forms with the block stand, you lose about an inch - so it becomes something like 4.5" thick.   I'm thinking about the hearth and the materials required as I run to the hardware store and I found a bunch tips that I'm going to use in my hearth build via the  Blood Sweat and Beers YouTube channel  -  this video where he walks through his reinforced hearth forms and setup .   I thought it was worth documenting here

DIY Pizza Oven Foundation Slab - Rebar and Reinforcement - May 2024

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Last week, I ran through the details of the final dimensions of our backyard wood-fired pizza oven including the reinforced slab, the block stand and the insulated hearth.  I had been thinking of a 39" diameter oven and after looking through the actual dimensions of the block stand (less than 16" per block), I've settled on these final dimensions: Reinforced foundation slab: 72" wide x 80" deep. Stand: 4 blocks wide x 4.5 blocks deep - 62.5" wide x 70.312" deep. Hearth: Same as stand.  Framed with 2x6 dimensional lumber. Oven: 39" interior, 51" exterior side-to-side x 64" front-to-back. The first major task is to pour the foundation slab.  The steps to get that done include: Excavate the site Lay down 1/2" gravel and compact the base Think about drainage on/around the foundation slab  Set up the forms and stake them level and square Buy the material (concrete, rebar, cinder blocks, angle iron) Lay down a 6 mil vapor barrier In

River Rock Added to Pizza Oven Sub-Surface for Drainage - March 2024

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I last added ten (10) bags of gravel to the excavated wood-fired pizza oven construction site to begin to level the area.  As a reminder, this is being built on-top of our drywell, so this gravel layer is an extra insurance policy for drainage below the slab in hopes of avoiding heaving.  When I added the ten bags, I noted that I thought I'd need another round of gravel to finish the project.  Before heading to the store, I eye-balled the site and decided that I needed a bit more material on the western edge of the site.  Thanks to a sale, I decided to add six (6) bags of River Rock to that side.  Thinking that the larger size of the rocks would fill in the deeper portion of the dig - that part is going to *mostly* be outside the footprint of the foundation.   Here's the site after six bags of river rock added to the left side (note the different color): Below is the Menards item # for the River Rock - 180-2006.  Normally priced $3.49 per bag, it was on sale for $2.24.   I'

Adding Gravel to Pizza Oven Foundation Prep - Backyard Wood-Fired Oven - March 2024

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The last progress-report on our backyard pizza oven was earlier in March when I showed the cut-down concrete slab framing pieces (2x6's) that I cut to the final dimension s (Slab: 78" wide, 86" deep. 6.5' wide, 7'2" deep. Stand: 72 wide, 80 deep - 4.5 blocks wide, 5 blocks deep).  In that post, I talked about the next step is to fill the excavated cavity with gravel ahead of the rest of the slab prep. I went over to Menards and picked up 10 0.5 cubic foot bags of their multi-purpose gravel.  Each bag is supposed to cover about six square feet.  I wasn't sure how far these ten bags would go, but I figured that was about the limit that I wanted to push my car weight-wise.   I brought the ten bags home and hauled them (one-by-one) to the site and piled them up: Opening each bag and spreading it out, I quickly discovered that I was FAR short of the amount of gravel that I REALLY needed to complete the project.  Below, is what the site looks like after ten ha

Backyard Pizza Oven Construction - Foundation Slab and Stand Material Options and Details - March 2024

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With excavation started on the site of our backyard wood-fired pizza oven (on our drywell) , I need to move from the theoretical (What could an oven look like?  How high should it be?  What would it need to be made out of?  How many cinder blocks? What layout?) In my recent post on excavation , I ran through some mental math to figure out what size the hole needs to be, what size the slab will be and how wide the block foundation will be once constructed.  I ran through both a 10x8x16 block scenario and an 8x8x16 block scenario.   The 8x8x16 is the traditional block, but I was considering if the extra 2" block in the first (one or two) courses is appropriate to all for the footing of a brick face on the sides of the oven. Off I went to Menards to poke around in the construction block section.  Back in January, I posted the details of how there are L-shaped cinder blocks that help make proper corners and I wondered if I should be using those to make a square pizza oven stand .    I