Bald Cypress - Caliper Measurement - September 2022

One of the things that I've been meaning to do this growing season is to get out and capture a full caliper measure of all of our planted trees.  I didn't get to it last year, so the existing data I have on the trees size-wise is from 2020.  On this year's to-do list, I included a mention of 'capturing the caliper measures', so it has been on my mind all season.  Have I measured all the trees?  Nope.  But, I did measure one (so far).  And it is the Bald Cypress that has grown massively over the past few growing seasons.  That growth is why I started with this tree.

What does the tree look like today?  It is tall and stout and I'd consider it the best/most-productive tree that we've planted.  See below for the current state.  I have not pruned one branch off of this, but the time is coming.  See that driveway on the right side of the photo?  That wasn't there when this tree was planted, so this will now need to get limb'd up so it doesn't rub on vehicles.   But, from what I've read, the best time to prune or limb-up a Bald Cypress is late Winter/very early Spring.  


The growth on this is easy to see by the eye.  It is larger, taller and broader than it was just a year ago.  

Compare where this tree started - in September of 2018.  Four growing seasons.  From a tiny, almost bare tree to what you see today.  Below is a side-by-side comparison:


The last (and only) time that I took the caliper measure was February of 2020.  Then - and now - I did the same process:  Measured six inches up from the root flare and measured there.   In February of 2020, the Bald Cypress was: 1.21" caliper.  

What is it today?  Here, below, is a photo showing the current measurement at six-inches tall:

3.47" caliper measurement at six-inches from the rootflare on this Bald Cypress. 

That means, across 31 months, this tree put on 2.26" of trunk thickness.  It almost tripled in size in those (almost) three growing seasons.  That's significant.   Back in early 2020, this was the '5th smallest tree'.  Won't know where it ranks until I take the rest of the measures.    

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